Tuesday, February 04, 2014

How Toddlers Thrive Book Tour: Foreword by Sarah Jessica Parker and a Giveaway (US/CAN; 2 Winners)!

About How Toddlers Thrive, by Tovah P. Klein, Ph.D.:

In How Toddlers Thrive, Dr. Tovah Klein empowers parents everywhere to understand the often-mystifying aspects of toddler behavior. Going deeper, she delivers an eminently practical program for ensuring toddlers receive the right kinds and amounts of attention, guidance and reinforcement they need to develop such key skills as resilience, self- reliance, self-regulation and empathy. Her extensive research and interaction with thousands of toddlers makes her uniquely qualified to show the way to “toddlertopia” -- where the little ones are happy and flourishing while parents watch with proud smiles on their faces.

Beginning with a relatable, down-to earth foreword by Sarah Jessica Parker -- one of the many parents in New York City and beyond whose children have benefited greatly from Dr. Klein’s guidance -- How Toddlers Thrive unpacks the toddler mind, making sense of the unique combination of headstrong independence and close attachment that can be perplexing to both new and experienced parents.

Dr. Klein then breaks down the latest scientific understanding of toddler brains to definitively show that these are the years when the neural pathways needed for thriving in life are laid down. After finishing this initial section, parents will be far more effective with their toddlers, as they will have the ability to see the world from a toddler’s viewpoint and understand the critical question of why their little ones do the (sometimes inscrutable) things they do.

In the second half of the book, readers get a practical, adaptable set of techniques for “cracking the code” of toddler behavior, from how to handle specific challenges like eating, sleeping and toilet training to broader concepts like managing change and sharing. Dr. Klein’s groundbreaking and essential insights include:

• Why “The Terrible Twos” is a myth, and how accepting it as a given is a mistake.
• The inadvertent ways well-meaning parents “shame” toddlers and in doing so harm their development.
• Why taking a “seven day” view of a toddler’s eating habits -- as opposed to strictly enforcing every single meal -- is the only approach to healthy eating that is unlikely to backfire.
• How parents can identify and learn from the important links between how they were parented and how they approach raising their toddlers.
• Why telling a toddler to share can be a bad idea.
• Everything you need to know about tantrums -- when and how to nip them in the bud, and when to let them be.

How Toddlers Thrive concludes with a motivating “Fifteen Seeds of Success” plan that crystallizes why the toddler years are a true lab for later, and lays a strong foundation for long-term happiness and fulfillment -- for parent and toddler alike.

Foreword by Sarah Jessica Parker

I come from a big family. My childhood memories include plenty of playful days, and lots of siblings taking care of one another, serving as extra sets of hands for my parents. We were very loved but also allowed to be independent. I became a mother to a much smaller brood, and initially approached mothering my first child (and then the other two) with as much intensity and fierce determination as my mother had given all of her eight kids combined. All the while feeling -- like many mothers -- that I wasn’t doing enough. Then I met Tovah Klein and realized that my mother may have had it right all along. Tovah taught me that the space given to children raised in a big, bustling family may actually do a better job giving them a sense of self, of self-respect, and of confidence in their own accomplishments. Tovah taught me how to resist the temptation to fix everything, and instead give my children the opportunity to learn how to problem-solve for themselves.

My three children are all different, but my husband and I have the tools to parent each of them in ways that works for them. One is outgoing, another cried and cried whenever I left her at school, and another is cut and dry. Tovah taught me that there is no one right way to parent, and no right way for children to experience childhood. Judging myself or the child risks inadvertently imposing a feeling of shame that does more to set back than to help. Tovah’s parenting approach enabled me to get inside the complicated mind of my then two year olds; to give choices, but not too many; to establish order and still give them freedom. I went from feeling overwhelmed to feeling confident, all while giving my children their own sense of confidence in themselves that I see further developing as they grow. I hope the same for you and your children. Enjoy!

About the author, Tovah P. Klein, Ph.D.

Photo credit: Carol Weinberg
At the Barnard Toddler Center, Professor Klein and her research team study children’s social and emotional development, the influence of parents on children’s development, and the experience of being a parent in the early years. The research looks at the ways mothers and fathers transition to parenthood and negotiate the challenges of work and family issues. Another line of research focuses on the impact of trauma on young children and their families, looking at children who were direct witness to the events of 9/11. A newer study examines how toddlers communicate through and use play to process and learn about emotions, from everyday/typical situations (i.e., separation) to stressful (i.e., a new baby; emergency room visits) and traumatic situations.

Tovah has served as a developmental advisor for Sesame Street and is on the advisory boards for Room to Grow, Rawanda Educational Assistance Project and NYC Voices of Childhood. Her advice has appeared in The New York Times, Redbook, Parents, and countless other publications. She is the mother of three boys and lives in New York City.

Visit www.howtoddlersthrive.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/howtoddlersthrive
Twitter: https://twitter.com/tovahklein



GIVEAWAY

Two lucky winners will receive a copy of How Toddlers Thrive, by Tovah P. Klein, Ph.D. This giveaway is open to residents of the United States and Canada, and will end at 11:59 PM EST on Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Enter through the Rafflecopter form below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway




Disclosure: This post contains my Amazon affiliate link. Susan Heim on Parenting is not responsible for prize fulfillment.

38 comments:

  1. deb kennedy11:39 AM

    Incredible,I have been searching for this information for months, then wake up this a.m. to find it on your post! Am so so excited! Thank you!

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    Replies
    1. My son went through an alarming few weeks of night terrors that certainly terrified me!

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    2. I am the book author-- and yes, that can be very scary. I cover this in the book, and how to handle them. They are normal and disappear in time.

      Delete
  2. I don't know what my most perplexing toddler moment is yet! :) I'm hoping to win this book before my niece becomes a toddler, to help us understand her development. :)

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  3. It would be tantrums

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  4. Anonymous4:25 AM

    This would be amazing for my daughter.

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  5. My most perplexing moment was watching a toddler have a complete meltdown because a large truck drove away and the driver didn't wave.

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  6. My most perplexing toddler moment right now would be, my son making such a mess with his toys, and i mean a mess, looks like a hurricane has went through my house.

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  7. Food fights with my toddler (among other battles) have been most frustrating for the past few months (she's 2.5). I try to be as patient as possible but it gets challenging!

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  8. Stephanie Colvin3:51 PM

    Headbanging and headbutting when he is angry...and climbing! I can't stop him from climbing on everything!

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  9. The most perplexing moments have been trying to get my toddler to stop biting people, especially his older brother!

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  10. My toddler is not listening to me. Not following rules.

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  11. Most perplexing for me right now is why my son keeps biting his fingernails!

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  12. eleanor11:00 PM

    I'm waiting for my infant to grow into a toddler.

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  13. She's still becoming a toddler, but already facing some hardcore tantrums.

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  14. I guess cooking food that both my toddlers, my husband, and I all enjoy together instead of separate meals to appease everyone's taste buds.

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  15. My most perplexing moment was when my normally sweet, angelic little girl, drew all over my expensive, leather chair, because we weren't paying attention to her. we pay a LOT of attention to her. Then after much crying and promising to never do it again.....she did it again. Melissa Alvarado

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  16. My younger daughter is 2 1/2 and a complete 360* from my first daughter. Natalie will color on the walls, scream constantly, throw herself on the floor, refuse to eat, refuse to sleep, refuse to drink...it seems she is continuously in defiant mode!

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  17. Our current biggest problem is going to and staying in bed.

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  18. bedtime and picky with foods

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  19. When my daughter started walking, she began on her tip toes...and just never stopped. At 4 we took her to the Dr - he said that by 6 or 7 it wouldn't be a problem...we've done the stretches and exercises...without solving the issue...she's now 10 and still a tippyToe Walker 95% of the time. abrennan09@hotmail.com

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  20. Mealtimes are tough with my toddler, as well as transitions and getting out the door in the morning.

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  21. alona y7:26 PM

    My baby is almost a toddler, so we're not there yet. I would love to win this book so I can study ahead!

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  22. Anonymous9:01 AM

    sandra manning - This would be great for my grand kids =)

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  23. Anonymous4:41 PM

    The most perplexing problem would be tantrums.

    Mallory Bailey
    mallorybailey1@gmail.com

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  24. The most perplexing problem is how to handle tantrums in public places.

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  25. Daniel M10:23 PM

    picky eater, but then again so am i - regnod(at)yahoo(d0t)com

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  26. Anonymous12:41 PM

    ben s - tantrums! argh!

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  27. Refusing food that just the day before they ate with relish.
    patricia dot mariani dot esq at gmail dot com

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  28. Nothing so far, maybe the enjoyment of taking ALL of the tissues out of the tissue box?

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  29. I don't have kids of my own yet so I don't have a trying moment but would like to read for future knowledge and to assist with the kids i babysit.

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  30. I don't really have any problems with my granddaughter as of yet.

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  31. My 2 year old has started hiding. He'll sit on the floor behind Dad;s chair, run behind the doors, or crawl under the beds. It's becoming a pain to chase him down to go out, or eat, or get dressed, etc.

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  32. i have had a hard time getting out toddler to eat his veggies. i am tony l smoaks on rafflecopter!

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  33. biting fingernails is something i am puzzled about :)

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  34. Mine is trying to figure out why my son bites and how to get him to stop.

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  35. I am enjoying reading all of these, each touches on toddler moments. I have covered them all in How Toddlers Thrive- and would love to hear what you find helpful. Happy raising toddlers! Tovah Klein

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