Monday, April 02, 2012

Food Fights: Valuable Advice for Ending the Eating Battles with Your Kids! #GIVEAWAY

As parents, many of us know that we can offer our children all kinds of healthy foods, but actually getting them to eat it isn’t always easy! Since I’ve got a picky kid of my own, I was excited to hear about the book, Food Fights: Winning the Nutritional Challenges of Parenthood Armed with Insight, Humor, and a Bottle of Ketchup, by Laura A. Jana, MD, FAAP, and Jennifer Shu, MD, FAAP. Whether you’ve got babies, toddlers, or young kids, this book provides invaluable advice for, as they say, bringing “peas and harmony” to your family’s table! Check out the following excerpt on snacking from Food Fights:

WHAT’S LACKING IN SNACKING

What’s Not Lacking in Snacking
One of the biggest problems with snacks is, quite simply, that they typically consist of high-calorie, unhealthy foods rather than nutrient-dense, healthy foods. With fresh fruit all too frequently replaced by juice and other sugary drinks, more candy, less milk, and the prize for the largest increase in snack foods over the past 30 years going to chips and crackers, what’s clearly not lacking in snacking is salt, sugar, and fat.

Smart Snacking
So now that you know what not to serve for snacks, we wanted to make sure to impress on you the fact that snacking can and still should play an important role in your child’s daily diet. Simply put, the right approach to snacking can help keep kids from getting hungry and cranky while also giving them added energy and (if you plan it right) added nutrients. By following simple, smart snacking advice like the tips below, you can ultimately help your child grow better, think better, and stay active throughout the day and throughout childhood.

Snacks should not be the exception to the rule that food, in general, should have nutritional value. Make sure you commit to applying the same noble goals in choosing your snacks as you (hopefully) do for your child’s meals.

Keep finger foods on hand. Finding foods that are quick and easy to grab and serve is actually quite easy. Simply cut up some fresh fruits or veggies; keep whole grain crackers, pretzels, or ready-to-eat (and preferably low-sugar/high-fiber) cereals on hand; and then let your toddler or older child handle the feeding part independently.

Don’t be fooled by packaging. Labels on snack foods for kids, along with sugary children’s cereals, seem to be the most commonly misleading when it comes to nutrition. Don’t let creative labeling such as “fruit snacks” or “low-fat” lead you to believe that sugary treats are necessarily healthy.

Figure out some “free foods” that your child can eat at any time. It’s entirely appropriate to agree on some healthy “free foods” (such as fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or hard-boiled eggs, for example) that your child can sit down and eat whenever he’s hungry. Remembering that your ultimate goal is to help your child learn to eat when he’s hungry and refrain when he’s not, your role is to simply make very sure that the criteria you use for creating this list is based squarely on the food’s nutritional value.

Keep junk food out of sight and out of mind. This means not only limiting the amount of junk food you buy and allow into your pantry, but also the amount of television your child is allowed to watch. With literally thousands of television ads designed specifically to make your child’s mouth water over unhealthy snacks and cereals, turning off the television -- not just when you’re eating but keeping it turned off throughout the day -- can go a long way toward preventing unhealthy eating habits.

If you find it difficult to get your children to eat healthy foods, I hope you’ll check out Food Fights!



GIVEAWAY

One lucky winner will receive a paperback copy of Food Fights: Winning the Nutritional Challenges of Parenthood Armed with Insight, Humor, and a Bottle of Ketchup, by Laura A. Jana, MD, FAAP, and Jennifer Shu, MD, FAAP! To enter, simply fill out the Rafflecopter form below. This giveaway is open to US residents only and ends at 11:59 PM EST on Monday, April 16, 2012.



a Rafflecopter giveaway




22 comments:

  1. I love making the food into different shapes. Sandwiches look like lions, fruit in flower shapes, etc.

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  2. I sometimes hide the junk

    felecia@twinoaksfl.org

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  3. If you can blend the healthy stuff and then "sneak" it in, it can help with picky eaters.
    wordsmoveme at gmail dot com

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  4. I agree with sneaking it in with more fun food!

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  5. I have my kids try one bite or no dessert!

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  6. I sneak it into something they already love.

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  7. My one year old is very picky. I blend it in with other foods. I also don't give up. I show him that I will try it and then it's his turn to try it.

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  8. I think the best way to get a picky eater to try new things is to let them cook the item with you.
    jtmagmom73(at)gmail(dot)com

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  9. Using the line 'eat a little of this and then you can have that'

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  10. decorate the food and make it enticing for my kids to eat - (Paul T / Pauline T…pls use emscout9 at hotmail dot com instead of gmail to contact me)

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  11. Anonymous2:49 PM

    Put in macaroni and cheese. users20@rocketmail.com

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  12. All I have to do is sit down to eat and they descend on me LOL. It really doesn't take much more than that.

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  13. Telling them is another variation of a food they like!

    freebiegoddess03@aol.com

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  14. I just keep making things every night and offering them to him.

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  15. Anonymous4:27 PM

    Preparing the meal with you can help.

    theyyyguy@yahoo.com

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  16. Daniel M5:23 PM

    you can mix any veggie/fruit in any meal when you cut it small enough - regnod(at)yahoo(d0t)com

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  17. make it fun for them by counting who tries the most food or who can taste the most
    vmkids3 at msn dot com

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  18. My tip for getting a picky eater to try new foods is to combine new foods with ones he or she already likes.

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  19. I had to be creative my seven year old is a picky eater I had mix up the foods so she will eat it
    cookster77@aol.com

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  20. I just keep trying new things and making him at least take a "thank you helping" of whatever I make. This is my fiance, not a child, mind you. =D

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  21. Adding a little bit of sugar to it. Makes everything taste better!

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